Soldier of Fortune: The Wolf Cub by David Pilling

Here’s another Robin Hood author taking a look at a different period in history with his new book. David Pilling is something of an expert on Hood so I was very pleased to find out he was a fan of my work.

I read his new book,  The Wolf Cub and liked it so much I gave it a five star review on Amazon (where it’s currently at number 2 in the historical fantasy chart).

If you’re stuck for something to read you should really check out David’s work, you’re sure to find something you’ll enjoy. I recommend starting with The Wolf Cub as it kicks off what should be an excellent series!

Click the cover art to find out more

Robin Hood

We share a cover artist too…

1453 AD. The great city of Constantinople, last remnant of the once-mighty Roman Empire, falls to the Ottoman armies of Sultan Mehmed the Conqueror.

An English knight named Sir John Page is taken prisoner by the Ottomans, and forced to entertain the Sultan with tales of the West. Page chooses to tell the story of his own long career as a soldier of fortune in France, Bohemia and the Italian city-states.

Page’s tale begins in the year of Agincourt, Henry V’s famous victory over the French. As the bastard son of Thomas Page, a famous mercenary captain known as The Half-Hanged Man or The Wolf of Burgundy, Page soon acquires the nickname of The Wolf Cub.

After slaying his cousin in a duel, Page flees his home and joins a band of outlaws in the forests of Sussex. At last – tired of the brutality of his companions – he decides to leave England and join the English army in Normandy. There he endures brutal sieges, vicious combats, torture, betrayal and imprisonment, all to win glory and redeem his father’s name.

Trapped in the Sultan’s prison, Page must hope his story is enough to save him from the executioner’s blade….at least for another three days…

robin hood fiction

Click on David’s pic to take a look at his website!

One thought on “Soldier of Fortune: The Wolf Cub by David Pilling

  1. Pingback: My cover art vs the finished article… | STEVEN A. McKAY

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